Innovation on Earth

Global Citizenship Resources for Innovation Academy and Beyond

Guest Post: Brazilian History

BrazilMapDiego is still in Rio de Janeiro, and here’s his second guest post, sharing a bit about Brazilian history!

* * * * * * * * *

On July 3rd I went to the National Historical Museum in Rio de Janeiro and learned about Brazil’s history.

DiegoTrunkIn the museum I learned about Native Brazilians and their culture.  One thing that I learned was that when a chief dies, there is a ceremony to send him off.  The natives dance around a decorated trunk that is supposed to represent the chief’s spirit.  After that they take the best fighters in the tribe and they wrestle as a game.  The last thing they do is to send the trunk down a river and chant as it floats away.

DiegoArrowsI learned about the weapons that the Native Brazilians would use.  One weapon that they used resembled a sword but it was called a wooden club.  A wooden club was a close ranged weapon that was used to hit someone.  They also used long ranged weapons, the bow and arrow.  Something else I learned about the bow and arrow was that some arrows can be as large as a spear.

Next week I will blog about going to my grandfather’s beach house.  I hope to go to the beach, collect shells, paddle board, and have lots of fun!

Single Post Navigation

4 thoughts on “Guest Post: Brazilian History

  1. Anna S. on said:

    Neat! The Brazilians have an interesting history. How come the people wrestled as a part of the ceremony to send away the chief?

  2. The ceremony when a Chief dies sounds very festive and not sad at all. I was surprised to hear the arrows can be as long as spears. I hope you have a great time at your Grandfather’s beach house.

  3. Pingback: Guest Post from the Brazilian Beach | Innovation on Earth

  4. ThomasK on said:

    The ceremony for dead Native Brazilian Chiefs is not much different from a funeral today. The decorated trunk is like a casket and both ceremonies involve music and people coming together. Thanks for sharing what you learned about Brazilian history, Diego.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: